Friday, February 7, 2014

Taking a Gamble.

I am often guilty of buying wine just because I like the label.  It can be a bit of a gamble (sorry, couldn't resist) selecting wine in this manner, but that's just the daredevil-type person I am (yea, right).  Sometimes the gamble pays off, but more often than not the wine turns out to be not so good.  When the wine turns out to be a winner I generally feel very pleased with myself.  The Gamble Family Vineyards, 2012 Sauvignon blanc (Yountville) is one such wine.  However, I chose this particular bottle of wine because of it's back label. 
Now, I don't normally like labels to have too much information on them.  I am more interested in the wine than somebody waffling on about their family history etc., but this label happens to be informative and fun.  I was interested to learn that this Savignon blanc (SB) is made from two different clones of SB; Sauvignon Musque (from the Loire) and the Preston clone (from Graves).  Am I familiar with these two clones?  Can I taste each of these clone's unique characteristics?  No, on both counts.  But it does get me thinking about viticulture and all the other stuff I love about wine other than simply how the wine tastes.  As it happens, this SB tasted great; nicely balanced acidity, a mouth-filling mid-palate, nice tropical fruit expression (with lashings of sweet candied-pineapple) and a satisfyingly long finish.
The fun stuff?  I like the inclusion of the case production figure - I just find it an interesting little factoid.  And I love the line, "...slowly made into wine by Gamble Family Vineyards" - because I agree with the old adage that says that 'wine is a journey, not a destination'.  Though I'm not sure about the Gamble Family's being desirous of me to, "...enjoy this wine over several hours" - I think I'd need more than just one bottle to make this delightful tipple last that long.

6 comments:

Dennis Tsiorbas said...

Vinogirl, I'm loving the "lashing", but I'm not sure if it's a bit of an "English" expression or a bit of S&M, but either way the fun you had with this has carried nicely into the review.
If I see this, I'll buy it, if it's not too expensive ;-)

Thomas said...

VG:

Were there any of those boxwood/cat pee overtones?

I ask because I hardly ever get those pronounced aromas from white Bordeaux, but do get it from the Loire--although it's hardly ever as strong as from New Zealand or the U.S. Maybe it's the clones.

Gamble--have not seen that in these parts, but haven't been looking wither. I shall start to look.

Thomas said...

wither? try either.

One day I''l learn to tupe.

About Last Weekend said...

Ha ha! Enjoy this wine over several hours. Clearly they have never met a kiwi!

Thud said...

Beer is a burp not a beverage.

Vinogirl said...

NHW: I think it retails in the low $20s.

Tomasso: Really didn't detect any 'civet' in this wine - more a hot-weather expression of SB, especially when compared to the NZ style.

ALW: It is a bit unrealistic for the majority of wine drinkers, isn't it?

Thud: Burp on, dear brother.